Double-Check


Viewable in 2D, 3D and 360° Virtual Reality.

I’ve been to this point before with 3D things, then failed, so I’m doing a double-check to see if my new 360° 3D virtual reality workflow is *really* working.
What’s different about it, you ask? Thanks for asking! I’ve modified the rendering process, which reduces the rendering speed and file size, which reduces the upload time to YouTube!
This is my first experiment with a 3D photo as the near point and a 3D video “picture-in-picture”, and now I’m going to have more fun than one person deserves!
Also, there are no rules that say we have to show 360 degrees of imagery in a 360° virtual reality scene—this one only has a 195 degree hFOV.

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Sidetracked


Viewable in 2D, 3D and 360° Virtual Reality.

As I explain in this 360° 3D virtual reality video, I was hoping to be out runnin’ and gunnin’ this morning, checking for camera movement anomalies, but I’m still having rendering issues.
Hopefully I have found a decent workflow compromise by rendering an XAVC video out of Sony Movie Studio or Vegas, then converting that to an h264 video with HandBrake.
I created the foreground scene, which is a photo shot with my cell phone, “mounted to the near point” with a Spherical Stereo Blender project.
The “picture-in-picture” 3D video in this 360° scene, “mounted to infinity”, as the old-school stereographers like to call it, was recorded with a Sony TD30. It has close to a 65 degree hFOV, which should almost fill the entire screen in a Google Cardboard or Gear VR type stereoscopic viewer.

You Have To Look Around In Here (UHD)


Viewable in 2D, 3D and 360° Virtual Reality.

[This is the 3840×2160 UHD version for comparison, and the UHD YouTube option still hasn’t processed, and I’m not waiting hours for that, either! 😦
Since it took almost 9 hours to render this short presentation, I’m tempted to stick with HD for my silly 360 degree fun and games, but I’m going to take a very close look at this comparison, first, if and when it processes… and BTW, I see some compression artifacts during the fade in and fade out, so this really needs a higher bitrate, which will increase the number of hours of rendering time even more! 😦 ]

Sometimes these 360° 3D virtual reality YouTube videos open up on your phone showing the intended opening view, and sometimes they don’t. Don’t ask me why. I guess it’s a gyro thing. :/
So, obviously you have to get used to looking around, and it also helps if there’s something to see when you are looking around. You got it, baby—paper dolls in a circle, holding hands. 🙂
This is also a 60fps test, to check for annoying strobing effects when you rotate the view, which I have noticed with my 30fps 360° 3D VR videos.
This is the 3840×2160 UHD version. I want to check the quality with Google Cardboard and Gear VR with a Samsung Galaxy S4 and a Note 5.
The composited (picture-in-picture) 3D video in this scene was recorded with a Sony TD30, and rendered in 60pfps, using Sony Movie Studio Platinum 13, as well as the final VR scene.
I used Blender to create the paper dolls and black video frame.

You Have To Look Around In Here (HD)


Viewable in 2D, 3D and 360° Virtual Reality.

Sometimes these 360° 3D virtual reality YouTube videos open up on your phone showing the intended opening view, and sometimes they don’t. Don’t ask me why. I guess it’s a gyro thing. :/
So, obviously you have to get used to looking around, and it also helps if there’s something to see when you are looking around. You got it, baby—paper dolls in a circle, holding hands. 🙂
This is also a 60fps test, to check for annoying strobing effects when you rotate the view, which I have noticed with my 30fps 360° 3D VR videos.
This is the 1920×1080 HD version. I want to check the quality with Google Cardboard and Gear VR with a Samsung Galaxy S4 and a Note 5, and I will try to render the 3840×2160 version tonight while I’m sleeping, since it’s going to take about 8 to 10 hours. :/
The composited (picture-in-picture) 3D video in this scene was recorded with a Sony TD30, and rendered in 60pfps, using Sony Movie Studio Platinum 13, as well as the final VR scene.
I used Blender to create the paper dolls and black video frame.

The Beast In 360°


Viewable in 2D, 3D, and 360° Virtual Reality.

Here’s my picture-in-picture 360° 3D virtual reality gag, where I place a square 3D video shot with my 5 inch stereo base image-splitter, *The Beast* into a 360° 3D virtual reality Blender scene.
You can see my new “logo” placement at the top and bottom by looking almost straight up or almost straight down in your virtual reality VR headset, e.g., Google Cardboard 2.0.
I looped the short picture-in-picture video a few times, so there’s enough time to look around.