Let’s Just Get This Over With


Viewable in 2D, 3D and 360° Virtual Reality.

There’s no reason to drag this out any longer. Let’s see what happens when we float the dual Canon 3D rig around on a DIY Steadicam. It’s wrapped around the sphere about 160 horizontal degrees, based on the amount of stereoscopic depth (to avoid hurting anyone’s eyes).
The noise you hear in the background is the air-conditioner blasting away during this rare southern California heat wave.
I have added some pretty wallpaper in the background for people who prefer to have 360 degrees of imagery in their 360° virtual reality videos.
This video is extremely important, since it will show how much camera movement you can get away with when you are out runnin’ and gunnin’, shooting a 3D video that will be wrapped this far around the sphere, so let’s take a really close look at it with our stereoscopic VR viewers like Google Cardboard and Gear VR.

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Perfect Timing


Viewable in 2D, 3D and 360° Virtual Reality.

Let’s take a look at camera movement in 360° 3D virtual reality scenes, which will be more problematic the further we wrap them around a sphere. This one, for reference, has no movement. It is wrapped approximately 160 horizontal degrees, so the 1.3% NetD (net deviation, i.e., total stereoscopic depth) won’t hurt anyone’s eyes. It is “mounted to infinity” to avoid making anyone diverge their eyes.
I’ve added a background of my current Windows 10 desktop on my Ultrawide LG monitor, in case someone with a broken gyro in their phone happens to start the video in the wrong direction, and some people prefer to see imagery all the way around the 360 degree scene.
The 3D video was recorded with my dual Canon 3D rig, and I monitored the sync with a DIY BASIC Stamp sync monitor.
The 360° 3D VR scene was set up in a Blender Spherical Stereo project, and the final compositing was done with Sony Movie Studio Platinum 13.

I Am Not Going To Get Fat!


Viewable in 3D and 2D.

This is my first adventure out into the real world, calculating a stereo base for my dual Canon 3D rig, using settings for a cubic illusion, but staying within the limits of a 2-inch to a 5-inch stereoscopic lens separation, which insures the scene will look “normal”.

Making It Look Real


Viewable in 3D and 2D.

Making sure my dual Canon 3D rig is properly set up before I get too serious, the fact that the stereo base was extremely close to human eyes in this scene was only a coincidence, as I explain.
I’m not going to jump to conclusions and say that this technique of calculating the stereo base is a better way to go, because I know getting lucky on a first attempt can happen more often than not.
So, let’s just take this one video at a time, okay?